Amazon

Readers' Favorite

June 8, 2013

Bloggers Wanted: Excerpt Tour - July 1 - 5

Seeking bloggers to participate in an excerpt tour for 
Relics by Maer Wilson 



Most of Thulu and La Fi's clients are dead. Which is perfect since their detective agency caters to the supernatural. So, a job finding relics for an ancient daemon should be simple.

The daemon needs the relics to keep a dangerous portal closed. His enemy, Gabriel, wants the relics to open the portal and give his people access to a new feeding ground – Earth.

Stunning humanity with their existence, portals to other worlds begin to open and the creatures of magic return to Earth.

When Gabriel threatens their family, Thulu and La Fi's search becomes personal. The couple will need powerful allies in the race to find the relics before Gabriel does. But maybe that's what grateful dead, magical allies and daemonic clients are for.  

When the creatures of myth and magic return to Earth, they're nothing like your mother's fairy tales.

Join the Tour: July 1 - 5

The tour will include a prize pack giveaway


Tour Schedule:
July 1:
Cu's Ebook Giveaways
The Eternal Scribe
My Journey to Living Well

July 2:
Going off Dreams: the journey
Playing For Sweeps
OPEN

July 3:
The (Mis)Adventures of a Twenty-Something Year Old Girl
Cabin Goddess
Lubs Book Chatter

July 4:
Lucy Pireel
Library Girl Reads & Reviews
Keep in up with the Rheinlanders

July 5:
BookGoodies
Ali's Bookshelf
Girl Who Reads




A GWR Publicity promotional event paid for by the author.

Audio Book Review: Is This Tomorrow

June is audio book month, which is a good idea since so many people are traveling. Today's featured review is an audio book that would be perfect for a road trip. It is entertaining and engaging without being a huge distraction. Also, the subject matter and time period (late 1950s to 1960s) would make for great discussion when you stopped for meals.

Is This Tomorrow by Caroline Leavitt is a coming of age story, but not for one character, but for an entire neighborhood in Waltham, Massachusetts. It was a time of transition for nation. Fears were rising do to the threat of communism and the changes in societal rules. The issues of communism paranoia, civil rights, and the breakdown of the family unit - divorce - are brought into focus in the suburban neighborhood.   

The description on the CD box was a little misleading:

It's 1956, and working-mother Ava Lark and her son, Lewis, have rented a house in a less-than-welcoming Boston suburb. There, Lewis finds he is only able to befriend the other fatherless kids on the block, Jimmy and Rose. But when Jimmy goes missing, neighborhood paranoia ramps to new heights, further ostracizing Ava and Lewis.

While there are misgivings and suspicion of Ava, "ostracizing" is a bit strong. Even today if a child went missing we would question and scrutinize more closely those people who regularly brought strangers into the neighborhood. In the 1950s when divorce was a rare occurrence, of course they are going to be suspicious. Yet, there are mentions of neighbors helping her out.

The coming of age story comes from how each person deals with the disappearance of young boy. In real life we often do not see the years that follow as a community heals. While it seemed that most had moved on in the ten years that passes between Jimmy's disappearance and the discovery of his body, it was just a scab that had built up. 

The narrator Xe Sands was a perfect choice. She delivers the story in just the right voice. One could almost forget it was recording and not the characters themselves. It can be said that Is This Tomorrow is greater than the sum of its parts. There is not one thing I can point to and say "that's what made it great". It when you see the whole picture that you realize what a wonderful work of fiction it is.

Buy Is This Tomorrow at Amazon

Book Info: audio book, published may 2013 by Highbridge Audio, ISBN13: 9781622311422 
Source: Publisher
Listened: May 2013

Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small fee is earned when purchases are made at Amazon through the link above. A free audio book was provided by the source in exchange for an honest review.
Enhanced by Zemanta

June 7, 2013

I'm a Wuss! Should I Read Night Chill?

As you may know, I'm touring Night Chill by Jeff Gunhus this month. While I love a good thriller, I absolutely do not read horror. Jeff asked me about reading his new supernatural thriller and I was like yeah! I enjoyed his middle grades series so I was sure a book for adults would be great. Then, he sent me the cover:


The cover alone gave me the creeps. Seriously, my skin crawled and goose pimpled when I opened the email. (After the book blast on Monday where I had to check on all the blogs, seeing the cover that many times gave me nightmares. Every time I closed my eyes all I could see was the ghostly image of the cover. Monday night was pretty sleepless.)

Yet, the summary drew me in...

Emotionally scarred from a car accident in which a little girl was killed, Jack Tremont moves his family from Southern California to Prescott City in the quiet mountains of Western Maryland. At first, the small town appears to be the perfect place to reconnect with his family and to cure his troubled conscience, but Jack soon discovers he has left one nightmare only to walk into another. When a stranger who has been struck by lightning dies in Jack's arms, a child's voice comes from the man's smoldering body to issue a warning:
They're coming for your little girl, Jack. . . you better run. Take your family and run.
The warning turns prophetic when a local cult targets Jack's five year-old daughter Sarah and Jack finds himself in a fight against dark, supernatural forces that he cannot begin to understand. With the help of a mysterious Native American, Jack uncovers more than just a conspiracy that extends into the small community, but an ancient mystery larger than anything he could have imagined. Suddenly, he's not only fighting for his family, but also to stop a devastating evil from escaping into the world. Above all, he must rush against the clock to save his little girl.
But then some bloggers reviewing the book starting mentioning how creepy it was.

"This book is chilling" say Kriss, of Cabin Goddess

In Rayborn Rambles' review  it says, "you might struggle with the battle between wanting to hide under the covers...But this book is so well written and suspenseful,  you can't put it down."

Then there is Jeff's description at Amazon about how Night Chill is scary, in the "being home alone, the doors locked for the night, the kids asleep and, just as you close your eyes, you hear the creak of a floorboard downstairs. Followed by another. And another" kind of way. 

I'm just not sure I can handle it. I'm a big wuss. Seriously, here's some stuff that scares me.

  • Stephen King (Pet Semetary, Carrie)
  • Bunnicula (when I was little my sister made a deal with me to read it. I can't remember what I would get in return, but I couldn't make it past the red glowing eyes. My nephew laughed at me when I told him I couldn't read it).
  • The Godric's Hollow scene in the movie version of Deathly Hallows, particularly the part where the snake strikes towards the screen. I jump EVERY. SINGLE. TIME.
  • Friday the 13th movies - never seen one but the previews were scary enough
  • The movie poster for Arachnophobia
Now that you know a few of the things that scare me, I have a BIG favor to ask. Can you read Night Chill and tell me if it will give me nightmares? The ebook is only 99 cents this week. I really don't want to miss out on a great book, but I can't afford any more sleepless nights. Please, will you read it for me?

Buy Night Chill at Amazon


Night Chill


a Rafflecopter giveaway

This post is part of a paid GWR Publicity tour and as owner of GWR Publicity compensation was received for organizing the tour. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small fee is earned when purchases are made at Amazon through the links above.


Enhanced by Zemanta

June 6, 2013

Bloggers Wanted: Zaremba Book Blast - July 10

Bloggers are wanted for a book blast on July 10

Participants will have the choice of 6 excerpts to post on their blog.

Prize: Paperback of Zaremba, or Love and the Rule of Law (international giveaway)



In Warsaw, a shy and high-minded polio victim lives a life of seclusion caring for her odd family until a chance encounter plunges her into the intrigues of dirty politics; Zaremba, a wealthy businessman, is about to be arrested on trumped-up charges and only she can save him. Swept along by events, Cordelia finds her feelings increasingly involved with a stranger for whom she is both rescuer and victim. When Zaremba disappears, Cordelia must overcome surveillance, corruption, the media, and mounting humiliations and difficulties to learn the truth. 

Although set in Poland, this is a story that could happen anywhere, as young democracies struggle against the temptations of covert operations and older democracies sometimes lead them astray.





A GWR Publicity promotional event paid for by the author.
Enhanced by Zemanta

June 5, 2013

Lia Fairchild: Dabbling in Different Genres

A little more than two years ago, I received my first official review on this very blog. I had self-published my debut novel, In Search of Lucy, and somehow managed to get it to the Girl Who Reads. I was so new to the publishing world, I really didn’t know what to expect. But of course, I was hoping for a raving 5 star review. Well, I didn’t get one, and truthfully I was crushed. Donna did an excellent job with her review comments on the emotional points of the book that affected her and drew her into the story. The best of it was this,

“Lia does a great job of capturing the isolation, loneliness, and desperation of main character Lucy. I often found myself on the verge of tears and even cried as I read the last few pages of the book. It was a good emotional release.”

She also, gave me some extremely constructive criticism on the ending of the book and the fact that it had not been professionally edited. She was correct on both points. So I went back to the drawing board, revised my ending and had some incredibly nice authors help me clean it up. Positive reviews on Amazon started rolling, sales increased, and six months later I was contacted by a publisher about representing my book. I ended up signing with AmazonEncore, and Lucy got another make-over, including a new cover. It’s been a top 10 Drama on Amazon ever since.

Buy In the Search of Lucy at Amazon

After writing my first book I decided I need to explore other genres. I wanted to see what I was capable of and what I most enjoyed. So, I started with a short story mystery series called A Hint of Murder. Then I wrote a thriller, Vigil Annie. Finally, my newest book called The Tech Guy is chick lit/humor. I’d have to say that the thriller was the most difficult because it has mystery, action, romance, and suspense. Trying to weave all this through a storyline is not an easy task. But I thoroughly enjoyed creating a kick-ass female lead. I don’t think there are enough of those in books. Readers have called Vigil Annie,

"...suspenseful, well-crafted, and fast paced..."

"...a fun, intriguing read that will keep you guessing and make sure you don't want to stop."

“Annie is a terrific heroine--tough, sexy, and human.”

The book I enjoyed writing the most is my new one, The Tech Guy. This Chick Lit/Humor novel is written in first person, which was something I hadn’t done before. I loved being able to include funny light-hearted situations into the story, along with a pretty big surprise at the end. Readers have called it,

“Witty, charming, and romantic!”

"humorous, fun, heart-warming"

Now that I have tackled most of the genres that interest me, I’ve come full circle and decided to get back to the genre that started this journey for me. I’m currently writing a new contemporary fiction novel. This story is about three life-long friends bound by promises and the past. A past filled with two decades of laughter, love and secrets. But time marches on and the inseparable three girls grow into independent women, each pursuing lives along very different paths. The majority of the story takes place after twenty years of friendship and uncovers whether the ties that held them together as girls will be strong enough for them as women. These three friends will not only discover the true meaning of friendship, but also unveil truths about themselves they never knew existed.

Buy The Tech Guy at Amazon

This is the first time I’ve been in the process of writing a book without having at least some idea of a title in mind. I’d be happy to entertain any suggestions you may have based on the above description and the fact that it is set in a Southern California beach city. So feel free to stop by my author page at and post your suggestions or comment on this blog.

About the Author:

I’ve been creating stories my whole life, but only for me, in my own head. Then one day I sat down and started to write a book. I completed my first novel, In Search of Lucy, in February of 2011. Seven months later, AmazonEncore contacted me about representing my book. It’s currently in the top 10 for Kindle Drama.
I was born and raised in Southern California and hold a bachelor’s degree in journalism and a multiple subject teaching credential. I’m a wife and mother of two teenagers.
Twitter  *  Facebook  *  website

Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small fee is earned when purchases are made at Amazon through the links above. The beliefs, opinions, and views expressed by contributing authors are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of Girl Who Reads. A free ebook of In Search of Lucy was received from the author for an honest review.
Enhanced by Zemanta

June 4, 2013

Review: Wellesley Wives

June is a big travel month here in the US and I thought it might be fun to feature books that will take you to new destinations even if you aren't leaving home this summer.

First up is a trip to Ireland with Wellesley Wives by Suzy Duffy. You may remember Suzy's visit to Girl Who Reads back in October. You will find a few similarities between Suzy and the main character Popsy.

Wellesley Wives reminded me a lot of when I read Monarch Beach by Anita Hughes. If you read my review of Monarch Beach last summer, you may remember I had some difficulty getting into the story. I had the same problem with Wellesly Wives. I don't think I like reading stories about the rich. Or at least those in the Women's Fiction genre.

I couldn't connect with the characters or feel much sympathy for their troubles. I think I had the most sympathy for Popsy's husband and he's not in the story long. I cared a little bit about Popsy as she didn't really have much control of the events occurring in her life.  However, I wouldn't be friends with her. She would get on my nerves. Does she care about anything but the superficial? Sure, there was some references to her love for her children, but she didn't seem to take the time to have more than a surface relationship with them.

Speaking of her children... Rosie needs to learn to speak up for herself with her husband and Lily needs to grow up. Rosie seems to be a bit down to earth and I might have liked her, if she hadn't just went along with her husbands stupid idea and then make an even stupider decision to become emotionally involved with another man.

I thought the story started too slowly. I really didn't get into it until they reached Ireland. For the first time, the ladies are doing menial tasks - cleaning and cooking and serving. They also seem to develop some real relationships. If it hadn't been for the trip, I probably wouldn't have finished the novel.

Characters are a big part for whether I like a story or not and the characters just didn't do it for me.

There were some cute moments and in some ways reminded me of Mona Lisa Smile (I really liked the movie)If you can get past the fakeness and self-involvement of the rich, it is a good story about finding yourself while your world is falling down around your ears.

Buy the book Amazon!

Book Info: ebook, published September 2012 by The Writer's Coffee Shop, ISBN13: 9781612131092
Source: publicist
Read: April 2013

Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small fee is earned when purchases are made at Amazon through the link above. A free book was provided by the source mentioned in exchange for an honest review.

Enhanced by Zemanta

June 3, 2013

Meet MaryAnn Kempher

Hello, my name is MaryAnn Kempher. I’m originally from Milwaukee Wisconsin, but moved to Reno NV, where my book is set, when I was 15. I thought I was moving to Rio. Guess I should have paid better attention in geography. My first job was at the Circus Circus casino. Their second floor is devoted to carnival-like games. The floor is oval shaped and in the middle is a large stage where various circus acts were performed. Among many other acts, they had trapeze artists and even set up a boxing ring where they had a little woman pretend to fight with a kangaroo. Her name was Carol and she was super cool. I always wonder what she’s up to now.

When I was 21, I joined the Air Force. My first base was in California. But, before you think I was spoiled, think again. The base was in the middle of the Mojave desert and I didn’t have a car. I’m sure it’s a much nicer base now, and the surrounding cities (which were small) are much bigger and built up, but when I was there—there wasn’t much to do. I was fortunate to get to travel to a lot of different places; California, Korea, South Carolina, Italy, Florida, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar. It wasn’t always easy being in the military, sometimes it was really hard. Well into my career I’d married and had children. I had to leave for nearly 5 months once, over the holidays. That was hard, but we got through it. I retired, after 20 years, in 2007. I was lucky to get to stay home, to not have to go back to work.

This is when I discovered my passion for writing. I’d always liked to write, I didn’t mind the term papers and essays associated with college. But, it wasn’t until I’d retired that I tried to write for pleasure. This began in 2008. It’s funny how much this story changed over the course of the last four years. It started as such a different story. After a lot of revisions, my first book MOCHA, MOONLIGHT, AND MURDER was complete and published, just last April. 

If you’re a new writer, I do have some advice. Before you start writing, go out and buy some good self-help books in the genre you want to write. Needing a little guidance does not mean you don’t have talent. I’ve listed some really good ones at my website/blog. The books listed there really helped me. One more piece of advice. If you’re self-publishing, spend the money to get your book professionally edited and proofread. It’s worth it. I tell people that if they like Jane Austen and/or Agatha Christie, they’ll love this book. It’s a very nice combination of romance and mystery. I’m working on book two now and hope to have the first draft complete by the end of this summer.

MOCHA, MOONLIGHT, AND MURDER will be available for FREE 11-15 June.

Twitter  *  Facebook  *  Goodreads  *  Pinterest

About the Book:
Instead of feeding her late-night appetite, a midnight food run nearly gets 28-year-old Katherine O’Brian killed. She’s the only person to see the man who brutally murdered a local woman, and the killer is hell-bent on making sure she doesn’t talk.
Scott Mitchell left a broken engagement behind when he moved to Reno, and the last thing he needs is more melodrama. But when he and Katherine are paired for a college project, that’s what he gets. It can be very distracting when someone is out to kill your lab partner. Together, they try to figure out what the police haven’t been able to—the identity of the murderer. Passion flares, but with Katherine’s life in danger, romance seems like more than a bad idea.
Scott and Katherine will face jealousy, misunderstandings, lust, and rivals, not to mention attempted murder—and all before their first real date.
Buy it at Amazon!

Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small fee is earned when purchases are made at Amazon through the link above. The beliefs, opinions, and views expressed by contributing writers are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of Girl Who Reads.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Night Chill Tour Kick Off

From the author of middle grades spine-chilling horror series The Templar Chronicles comes a supernatural thriller for his adult fans


"Gunhus delivers a taut supernatural thriller...all the chops of an action-packed horror tale." - Kirkus Reviews

Emotionally scarred from a car accident in which a little girl was killed, Jack Tremont moves his family from Southern California to Prescott City in the quiet mountains of Western Maryland. At first, the small town appears to be the perfect place to reconnect with his family and to cure his troubled conscience, but Jack soon discovers he has left one nightmare only to walk into another. When a stranger who has been struck by lightning dies in Jack's arms, a child's voice comes from the man's smoldering body to issue a warning:  
They're coming for your little girl, Jack. . . you better run. Take your family and run. 

The warning turns prophetic when a local cult targets Jack's five year-old daughter Sarah and Jack finds himself in a fight against dark, supernatural forces that he cannot begin to understand. With the help of a mysterious Native American, Jack uncovers more than just a conspiracy that extends into the small community, but an ancient mystery larger than anything he could have imagined. Suddenly, he's not only fighting for his family, but also to stop a devastating evil from escaping into the world. Above all, he must rush against the clock to save his little girl.

Learn more at JeffGunhus.com

Buy the book at Amazon!

Night Chill

June 4 Tyrneathem Excerpt
June 5 The avid Reader Top Ten List
June 6 Rayborn Rambles Review
June 7 Girl Who Reads Friday Fun
June 8 Cu's e-Book Giveaways  Top Ten List
June 9 Drue's Random Chatter  Review
June 10 Lubs Book Chatter  Review & Author Interview
June 12 The Ginger Nuts of Horror Excerpt
June 13 I'm Shelf-ish Top Ten List
June 14 Paperback Princess Interview
June 15 Share My Destiny  Top Ten List
June 16 From the Bootheel Cotton Patch  Excerpt
June 17 Off the Page  Middle Grades vs Adult writing
June 18 The Geekdom Of Gore  Top Ten List
June 19 Books Direct  Review & Interview
June 20 Ali's Bookshelf  Top Ten List
Cabin Goddess  Review & Excerpt
June 21 Wag the Fox  Top Ten List
June 22 Mom With A Kindle  Excerpt

Enter the giveaway for a $25 Amazon gift card & Signed Paperback


a Rafflecopter giveaway

A GWR Publicity event paid for by the author. Giveaway is sponsored by the author. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small fee is earned when purchases are made at Amazon through the above link.
Enhanced by Zemanta

June 2, 2013

ArmchairBEA: Wrap up & Genres Missed

It's the last day of Armchair BEA and I'm here with some final thoughts. I hope you put them into some coherent form, but I'm so tired.

Wrap up...um...catch up is more apt

It was a busy week at the day job as well as at the side job. Also the week kind of snuck up on me so I wasn't as prepared as I have been in years past. Even though I wrote two of the posts last weekend in anticipation of the busy week, I still found myself at the end of the night squeezing in the posts the last couple of days. This meant that my post were not as well thought out as they could have been and the discussion wasn't as thorough as I would have liked. I decided to wait until this afternoon to write up this post instead of rushing through it yesterday.

Blogs & Comments

One of my favorite parts of ArmchairBEA, is hoping around to the blogs. In years past, I tried to visit a different set each day just to get a sampling of what else is out there. My reading of blogs was WAY down this year. I was able to catch up some yesterday morning (I checked out a number of the giveaways). I'm hoping to get to look in on a few more blogs this evening.

I've also have made a point of commenting on any blog I visit during Armchair BEA, but this year I just couldn't. Sometimes it was because I was on my tablet and the various commenting programs required me to login, which wasn't automatic on the tablet. Other times it was the captchas (they are really hard to read on the tablet). I was in such a time crunch that if I didn't have something to add to the topic I just skipped to the next blog. I noticed commenting on my own blog was down as well. It might have been because I wasn't commenting or because my posts were the quality they usually are or like me everyone was having a hard time getting around to everything.

Here are my posts for the week:
Introductions and Classics
Writer Wednesday Armchair BEA edition - a special reveal
Genre Fiction
Giveaway Day
Literary Fiction
Ethics and Non-Fiction
Keeping it Real and Young Adult Literature

Let's Party!

I was able to get to two of the Twitter parties. The third one was at 2 am this morning so I skipped it. They were fun and wild as always - the hour goes so fast and it is a bit difficult to keep up. The first party I was only partly at because it was during the day while at work so I had other things to do. I wish Friday night's party had been longer (and I actually did extend the discussion I was having with another blogger). Seeing how many people were at the 11 am eastern party saying they were at work, I wonder if the organizers will consider doing more later in the day parties next year. I'm also curious about how many attending were eastern time zone folks - the 2 am party last night probably would have been a good indication if most participants are in the eastern time zone.

Just my coincidence, I had organized a Twitter party for a client this week. She also happened to be an Armchair BEA sponsor. I wonder if people would be interested in having chats with authors during Armchair BEA. It would give those at home a chance to "meet" authors. And with Authorgraph.com there could even me book signings.

Giveaways

Once again giveaway day was very popular. This is the first year I've done a giveaway that was only for Armchair BEA participants. While it had a decent turn out, it wasn't overwhelming. Again, I think it is because people just didn't have time to get around to them all. Probably it would be better if bloggers listed what they were giving away in the linky, that way people that didn't want certain books or are international wouldn't waste there time going to giveaways they aren't interested in or eligible for.

I drew the winner of my $15 bookstore gift card/book depository book giveaway is Melissa of One Librarians Book Reviews. Congratulations!

I also won a few things this week. I was the daily topic winner on Day Two and Day Three. I got an audio book - Flat Water Tuesday by Ron Irwin - and a middle grades book for my niece and nephew - Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos. Since I don't need any more books to read, I enter individual blog giveaways that either had books for my niece and nephew (though of the 40 or so I visit not many were doing middle grades books) or gift cards figuring I could let them pick something out. Aren't I a great aunt?

Overall it was a good week and I'm looking forward to next year.

Genre Talk: What wasn't covered

I think we covered a pretty good spectrum of literary categories. If anything was lacking it was perhaps New Adult for audience category. Given that it is one of the fastest growing audiences, I was kind of shocked not to see it. I lumped it in with the Young Adult talk and from the comments I received, it seems that bloggers aren't as familiar with the term as the buying public would have you believe. Then again, maybe it's just the term that's unfamiliar. Amazon just added it as an option a week or so ago.

Graphic Novels was another missing category. I don't read graphic novels (I wasn't big on comic books growing up either). My nephew claims that's all he'll read, but I know that's not true. He loves to read, but he is also at that age were it isn't totally cool to be into books. I suspect that graphic novels lets him indulge in reading while maintaining his cool factor.

There also wasn't a focus on audio books. While I did incorporate titles of audio books in to the other posts, there wasn't an opportunity to talk about narration or multi vs. single narrators.

And last but not least, serials were left out (though I saw at least one blogger mention reading Dickens in the original serial format). Again, this is relatively new to the marketplace and may not have wide appeal among bloggers. I'm curious about how to review a serial. Do you review each installment or wait until it is finished? I've known books to start great and not end too well (and vice versa). Also, I've done a fair share of reading of online fiction and actually that's were I got my early start in reviewing. I remember one story that I loved the first 4 chapters or so, but then it took this crazy turn and I didn't love it so much any more. Unfortunately I had posted a review of the first chapters saying how great and realistic the story was. Should I have retracted my review?  I was never really sure how to handle it. I would hope that serial fiction being published wouldn't encounter such a problem, but I don't know. I guess it depends if the author is writing as they go or if it is a complete work being doled out in increments.

Speaking of the online fiction I read, perhaps Fan Fiction should have been given a category. The week before Armchair BEA, Amazon unveiled their new Kindle Worlds program. For a select group of popular franchises a license has been purchase to allow the publication of fan fiction. Depending on what happens with that, I expect it might be a topic next year. (It still remains to be seen how many people buy into, particularly with the news that the author may not truly hold the copyright to the original bits of their story).

What do you think was missed during ArmchairBEA?

Enhanced by Zemanta

Shareahollic

Amazon Studio

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...