Amazon

Readers' Favorite

September 10, 2016

Review: A Violet and Two Gentlemen by Petronela Ungureanu

by Susan Roberts

A Violet and Two Gentlemen is a stand alone victorian romance from Romanian author Petronela Ungureanu.

cover of A Violet and Two Gentlemen
Violet had previously had a large house and servants but due to her father's health problems she had to find a job to support them. She applies as a housekeeper in a home that is owned by Lord Wilton and gets the job immediately due to her background. Even though she is a beautiful young lady, she is more proud of her education and is very outspoken for the young women in this time period. Lord Wilton is a handsome young man who is distraught over the death of his wife and rarely leaves his room until he meets Violet. Will she be able to help him heal from his heartache and loss?

This book is very interesting - the clothes and the manners of the day are well done and there is the perfect amount of intrigue and romance in the novel. There is an interesting secondary character, Captain Thunder, a friend of Lord Wilton's from America who adds another romance interest to the story line.

I definitely enjoyed this book and highly recommend it. It's a fun read even if you don't usually read historical fiction.


Buy A Violet and Two Gentlemen at Amazon

Susan Roberts, reviewer. Susan grew up in the Detroit area but after deciding that city life wasn't for her she moved to North Carolina after college. She and her husband have several acres of land and they enjoy gardening and canning vegetables in the summer. They travel extensively. Susan reads almost anything (and the piles of books in her house prove that) but her favorite genres are Southern fiction, women's fiction, and thrillers. Susan is a top 1% Goodreads Reviewer. You can connect with Susan on Facebook or Twitter.

Book info:
available formats: ebook and print (230 pages)
published: May 2016 by CHBB Publishing
ISBN13: 978-1533342485
genres: historical, romance, Victorian
a free ebook was provided by the author for this review



Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

September 9, 2016

Review: The Metronome by D. R. Bell

by MK French

cover of The Metronome
Pavel Rostin was a promising physicist in Russia that married a young American woman. He came to the United States after a time, and eventually gave up being a physicist in order to participate in a risky financial venture. He wound up losing his home and his marriage, estranged from his father and living alone in New York City. His wife and children were in California, and he was trying to pull his life back together when he received a phone call telling him that his father was dead. Flying to Russia, he discovered that there was a mystery surrounding his father's death. There was also a diary of his father's experience in World War II, discovering an adopted brother he never knew he had, and an international financial conspiracy.

This is the first book in The Counterpoint Trilogy, but it's very much a standalone book. There are so many details about Pavel's life in New York, the visits to Russia and California as he retraced his father's final steps as an investigator, and explanations about the politics and finances in Russia and the United States after World War II. There is even an afterward detailing the research that went into the novel, with sources and links to further explore the information that made up the plot.

It's fascinating, something I never thought I would say about finances!

The relationships in the book are convoluted and detailed, and the flashbacks scattered throughout the novel really fleshes out and explains the nuances in their reactions to each other. These are flawed people caught up in a much larger puzzle, and the relationships change as more information is revealed.

The end of the book is a shocking surprise, but after everything else I discovered over the course of the book, it really wasn't a surprise once I thought about it. It's a great read and really got me thinking.

Buy The Metronome at Amazon

MK French, reviewer. Born and raised in New York City, M.K. started writing stories when very young, dreaming of different worlds and places to visit. She always had an interest in folklore, fairy tales, and the macabre, which has definitely influenced her work. She currently lives in the Midwest with her husband, three young children, and golden retriever.

Book info:
available formats: ebook and print (278 pages)
published: August 2014
ISBN13: 978-1511803373
genres: political, suspense




Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

September 8, 2016

Featured Book: Calabria - The Other Italy by Karen Haid

cover of Calabria
Once the hub of the Mediterranean, Calabria now dangles, largely ignored, at the bottom of the Italian boot, struggling for survival, acceptance and a place in modern Italy and the world. Little-known even to Italians outside the nefarious activities of its 'Ndrangheta mafia organization, Calabria allures with its simplicity and rewards with an underlying complexity, as in savoring an artisanal cheese, appreciating an ancient Greek masterwork or interpreting a particularly expressive phrase in the local dialect.

Calabria: The Other Italy paints a compelling picture of contemporary Calabria and Southern Italy, weaving observation, personal anecdote, salient historical information and social commentary into a nonfiction narrative that combines travelogue with an exploration of everyday life and culture. At times humorous, at others poignant, this engaging work portrays the joys and challenges of the "other Italy."
~Goodreads.com



“an intoxicating blend of humor, joy and reverence for this area in Italy’s deep south” (Publisher’s Weekly)

“part history, part travel guide, part memoir -- and as informed and informative as it is engaging and entertaining, making it very highly recommended” (Midwest Book Review)

“Calabria: The Other Italy is a phenomenal book that captures the heart and soul of one of Italy’s most obscure and attractive regions.” (PRIMO Italian American Magazine)


Start reading:



Buy Calabria: The Other Italy at Amazon




Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

Review: The Light of Paris by Eleanor Brown

by Susan Roberts



I love to travel and my favorite place to visit is Paris.  When I can't be there, I enjoy reading about this beautiful city.  The Light of Paris is a new book about the City of Lights.

cover of The Light of Paris

The Light of Paris was the first book that I've read by Eleanor Brown. I enjoyed it so much that I just ordered her first book (The Weird Sisters) from Amazon.

This novel is told from two viewpoints in alternating chapters - Madeleine in 1999 and her grandmother Margie in 1919. Both women had so much in common because they were both being forced by their parents and society to conform to the norms of their times and to become someone different than wanted to be. Madeleine is trapped in a loveless marriage and has had to give up her dreams of being an artist because her husband and mother thought that it was a ridiculous waste of time. Margie had given up her dreams to be a writer and was being forced into marriage because her parents didn't want her to be a spinster. When Madeleine goes to visit her mother, she finds Margie's journals about the three months that she spent in Paris pursuing her dreams. Will reading Margie's journals give Madeleine the courage to make changes in her life?

Brown did a fantastic job with the two main characters. They are both very complex but sympathetic and have a lot in common despite the years that separate them.

One of my favorite parts of the novel were the descriptions of Paris during Margie's time there. I love Paris and I love reading books about that wonderful city. The author didn't disappoint me at all with the Paris that she wrote about.

Buy The Light of Paris from Amazon
(A free galley was provided by NetGalley for this review)

Susan Roberts, reviewer. Susan grew up in the Detroit area but after deciding that city life wasn't for her she moved to North Carolina after college. She and her husband have several acres of land and they enjoy gardening and canning vegetables in the summer. They travel extensively. Susan reads almost anything (and the piles of books in her house prove that) but her favorite genres are Southern fiction, women's fiction, and thrillers. Susan is a top 1% Goodreads Reviewer. You can connect with Susan on Facebook or Twitter

Book info:
available formats: ebook and print (320 pages)
published: July 2016 by Penguin
ISBN13: 978-0399158919
genres: women's fiction, family life
source: Netgalley



Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

September 7, 2016

Coming-of-Age Mystery Explores Harsh Realities of Inner-City Life

cover of Watermark
Through swimming, Angel Ferente found relief from the troubles of home—a refuge from the responsibility of caring for her three younger sisters. But now, instead of being scouted by schools and getting ready for college, the talented high school senior in Elise Schiller’s debut novel, Watermark, has disappeared without a trace.

Raised by a drug-addicted mother and criminal step-father, Angel became her younger sisters’ only hope—and the rock that held her family together. Now, Angel is nowhere to be found. Last seen on public transit in the middle of the night, the talented competitive swimmer with an independent streak could have ended up just about anywhere. But on the rough streets of inner-city Philadelphia in the early 90’s, in a community plagued by drugs and violent crime, her family and friends are finding plenty of cause for concern.

“Narrated by Angel’s troubled younger sister Jeannine and her swim teammate Alex, Watermark explores the challenges of growing up in the inner city in the midst of the crack epidemic and how one girl found refuge through swimming  and the steadfast support of her team,” says Schiller. “Alex and Jeannine form a bond as they find ways to cope with Angel’s absence.”

With the help of their coach, CJ, and his local church, Angel’s teammates must work quickly to unravel the mystery of her disappearance and locate the talented young teen before it’s too late.

Watermark offers a unique exploration into many timely and poignant themes, including:
  • Problems with our child protective services
  • All young people have assets and strengths to be nurtured, regardless of race or economic status
  • The difference in education in the United States based on the economic status of the community is unconscionable
  • Social investments need to be made on the front end because the stresses of poverty and the resulting trauma are much harder to address, often impossible
  • The importance of youth sports and other youth development activities
Shedding light on the unique challenges of growing up in the chaos of poverty within a damaged family, Watermark, part captivating mystery, part coming-of-age story, in not to be missed!

About the Author:

A lifelong resident of Philadelphia, PA, Elise Schiller has spent more than three decades providing education and youth services in inner-city communities through her work in non-profit organizations, including her most recent 16-year position as the associate executive director at EducationWorks. Though she has published several short stories over the years, Watermark is her debut novel.

Start Reading:


Buy Watermark at Amazon




Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

Review: How to Bake a Murder by K.J. Emrick

by Elisa Hordon

cover of How to Bake a Murder
One of my all-time favourite cozy mysteries series is K.J. Emrick's Darcy Sweet Mysteries. It is an awesome small town, supernatural mystery series with wonderful characters and I just love it. I was super excited to read How to Bake a Murder; the first book in a new series from this amazing author. After reading How To Bake A Murder, I am really looking forward to reading more about Cookie, Jerry and everyone else.

Cookie owns and runs the ‘Kiss The Cook’ bakery on her own, and she loves it. This place is not just a business to Cookie, it's her home. So when someone dies in her bakery and another person is trying to make her sell, Cookie is determined to keep her bakery running.

Clarissa is Cookie's 16-year-old granddaughter. She is sassy, sullen, and she loves trying everyone’s patience, but when someone threatens her grandmother, look out, Clarissa shows what she is really made of.

Jerry, one of the local police officers, calls into 'Kiss The Cook' bakery every day. He loves grabbing his coffee and bagel before work; he also loves getting a smile from Cookie. Jerry is a little smitten where Cookie is concerned. It's really cute and seriously made me feel good about falling in love at any age.

I love how Cookie is so passionate about her bakery, I also love how even though she has had her heart broken before she is also willing to let Jerry in. I am not a fan of her best friend Jamie. She seems like a horrible person, and Cookie deserves friends who stick by her, not stab her in the back the minute she turns it.

The mystery was brilliant. The killer really did his research, and if it wasn't for some smarter people like Cookie and Jerry, he may have gotten away with it. Talk about dastardly plots with lots of twists and turns!

The ending was brilliantly nail biting. The story as a whole was well balanced and an absolute pleasure to read.

Buy How to Bake a Murder at Amazon

Elisa Hordon, reviewerElisa lives in the Southern Highlands of NSW, Australia where she spends her days reading, journaling, painting, cooking and homeschooling her daughter. She has always been an avid reader, Elisa loves reading many genres of books except horror; her favourite genres would be mystery, romance, and paranormal. Elisa also loves pursuing many creative outlets if she is not relaxing with a book she can be found writing, sketching, painting or cooking. Elisa loves to share her obsession with books especially with her family and friends. Reading and reviewing books is a favourite pastime of Elisa’s.

Book info:
available formats: ebook (195 pages)
published: July 2016 by South Coast Publishing
genres: cozy mystery





Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

September 6, 2016

Now Available: Just a Kiss by Denise Hunter

What Happens When You Fall In Love With Your Best Friend?

THE HAPPILY-EVER-AFTER, FEEL-GOOD FINAL STORY IN WIDELY BELOVED SUMMER HARBOR ROMANCE SERIES 

cover of Just a Kiss
Denise Hunter is the internationally published bestselling author of over 25 books, including Dancing with Fireflies and Falling Like Snowflakes. Her novel The Convenient Groom premiered as a Hallmark Channel feature film in June 2016, and in December 2016, the Hallmark Channel will premiere another feature film based on Hunter’s work, A December Bride.

Denise Hunter’s Summer Harbor series has had contemporary romance readers across the globe swooning since the September 2015 release of the trilogy’s first installment, Falling Like Snowflakes. On September 6, 2016, with the release of the third and final Summer Harbor story, Just a Kiss [Thomas Nelson/HarperCollins], fans will at last find out whether Riley Callahan and Paige Warren – best friends and the most star-crossed of Summer Harbor’s sweethearts – get a happily-ever-after after all. Anyone who has ever secretly fallen in love with their best friend is all too familiar with the special kind of heartache it can bring.

“Hunter balances the dark side of love and war with a winning combination: realistically exploring the role that faith plays in healing, deftly creating a potent romance, and giving significant space for the lively and lovable supporting cast of Summer Harbor friends. Fans will be sad to see the Callahans say goodbye, but this tale of recovery and bravery is a fine parting gift.” -- Publisher's Weekly

Riley Callahan’s plans to reveal his secret feelings for his best friend are derailed when his life is drastically altered in Afghanistan.

Watching the love of his life fall for his brother was enough to send Riley straight to boot camp. But over a year later, he’s officially a marine, and Beau and Paige are no longer an item. When Riley’s tour in Afghanistan is up, he intends to confess his feelings to Paige and win his best friend’s heart once and for all.

But all that changes when an IED takes the life of a comrade and leaves Riley an amputee. Now he’s heading home, injured and troubled. His plans to win Paige are a distant dream. She deserves so much more than the man that’s left. All he can do now is put some healthy distance between them. But upon his return, he discovers his family has arranged for him to stay with Paige.

Paige is a nurturer at heart and happy to take care of her best buddy. By all appearances, Riley is adjusting miraculously well to his disability. But as the days pass, Paige begins to see that the smiles and laughter are just a mask for the pain he’s hiding. To make matters worse, her job is in serious jeopardy. The animal shelter that she’s poured her heart into has lost its funding, and she has three months to come up with the money needed to save it.

As the weeks wear on, Paige’s feelings for Riley begin to shift into uncharted territory. Why is she suddenly noticing his arm muscles and the way his lips curl at the corners? Will she be able to deny her feelings for another Callahan brother? And will Riley let his heart heal so he can let Paige in?
~Goodreads.com

Start Reading:


Buy Just a Kiss at Amazon


Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

Book vs. Movie: The Giver by Lois Lowry

by Donna Huber

cover of The Giver
It was almost December, and Jonas was beginning to be frightened. No. Wrong word, Jonas thought. Frightened meant that deep, sickening feeling of something terrible about to happen. Frightened was the way he had felt a year ago when an unidentified aircraft had overflown the community twice. He had seen it both times. Squinting toward the sky, he had seen the sleek jet, almost a blur at its high speed, go past, and a second later heard the blast of sound that followed. Then one more time, a moment later, from the opposite direction, the same plane.






A couple of weeks ago, I noticed that The Giver was available at my digital library. Since I couldn't remember ever reading it I decided to check out the audiobook.

The writing is simplistic, making the story easily accessible to anyone. This is probably why The Giver was chosen as a World Book Night book. The goal of World Book Night is to get non-readers reading.

As today is Read a Book Day, I thought featuring The Giver would be a good choice.

While the writing was simplistic, the story is quite complex. It gives the reader a lot to think about and the answers aren't spoon-fed to the reader. My nephew had to read this book this summer, and he is an eighth grader. My mother was a little shocked it was on his reading list since she felt the reading level was probably more on the level of third grade. Yet, I think it is the complexity of the story that makes it an excellent read for eighth graders.

We desire fairness and equality, but at what cost? Is sameness the answer?

I really enjoyed the story. While The Giver is considered dystopian, I didn't feel it was like today's popular books in the genre. Hunger Games and Divergent were violent stories with definite "puppetmasters" imposing rules upon individuals. Yes, The Giver has the elders, but I don't think they are evil people oppressing those under them. From what little detail we have about them, I didn't get the impression they found joy in keeping love and pleasure from the people or had any ulterior motive other than to protect themselves and their community. In fact, they themselves live under the rules that governor sameness.

What may have had the most profound impact on me was the ending. It is what took a simple story exploring a possible "better world" to the next level for me. Did Jonas succeed or did he and Gabe die under the tree?

My nephew, my mother, and I thought came to the same conclusion as to how the story ended, though could see the possibility of the other outcome. I'm sure there is something to be said about the reader depending on which conclusion the reader draws.

Given the ambiguous ending, I was curious how the movie handled it. I was happy to see that my library had a copy of the movie this weekend. The librarian on duty said she loved the book as a child, but hadn't seen the movie. I told her surely they did a good job with it since it is such a short story. Longer stories always run the risk of having favorite parts cut in the interest of time.

While the majority of the story does play out on screen, there are some subtle changes. One notable change is Asher and Fiona's job designations. Their changed jobs allow them to have more of a role in the plot. The chief elder also has an expanded role, which probably had to be to snag Meryl Streep. The movie also infused the story with more contemporary elements of the dystopian genre. The elders seemed a bit more controlling. The great escape was also ramped up to add more action.

It was actually the ease of Jonas's escape in the book that made me realize that elders weren't about controlling the population as they would have been in today's dystopian novel.

I believe the screenwriters did believe most people would have read the book as details about how the society is was glossed over. In the book, there was mention of the different stages and what they each get (coats with buttons or pockets, wearing hair ribbons or a short haircut, etc.). The strict adherence to rules and the precision of language were still displayed but in a different manner.

As for the ending...The movie makers didn't go with how I thought the book ended. And that is all I'm going to say about the ending in case not everyone has read/watched it.

Overall, it was an excellent adaption of a book. I like Jeff Bridges and I thought he did a great job as the Giver.

If you have read the book and watched the movie, what did you think? Were the changes acceptable? Was the movie ending how you thought the book ended?

Buy The Giver at Amazon

Donna Huber, founder & publisher. Donna is an avid reader and natural encourager. She is the founder of Girl Who Reads and the author of how-to marketing book Secrets to a Successful Blog Tour.

Book info:
available formats: ebook, audio, print (192 pages)
published: April 1993 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN13: 9780395645666
target audience: young adult
genres: social issues



Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.



September 5, 2016

Featured Book: Between Medicine and the Innerworld by Peter Edwards

cover of Between Medicine and the Innerworld
A novel about medical professionals, depression, and life struggles

David likes to solve riddles. Life is the biggest riddle of all.

How did people come into existence, how are they alive at all…and what is the point of him walking into the hospital for his first day as an intern for his long sought after job as a doctor, if he could die at any moment—just disappear.

He does walk in, however, along with his questions and doubts, into the glorious Glendale Hospital—recently rumored to be experiencing a questionably higher than normal death rate. Unfortunately, the splendor of the first impression appearance of Glendale doesn’t rub off on David’s miserable one with Dr. Williams; the doctor he’s assigned as an intern for.

Williams is complex, he’s revered by the fellow hospital patrons, and when David isn’t trying to unpuzzle him, he realizes he’s being taught important lessons. That he needs to love what he does or quit, is one of them.

That one of the first files he’s handed, Lucy, isn’t just an assignment, she’s a patient. After being assigned to reveal horrific news about his new patient Lucy to her mother, who turns out to be a childhood friend, he walks solo towards her room, with thoughts of being infinite, yet fragile.

very well written ~ Molly

keeps you wanting more! ~ Jen L.

captivating ~ Clarice

Start reading:



Buy Between Medicine and the Innerworld at Amazon



Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

Review: Redemption Road by John Hart #MondayBlogs

by Susan Roberts

cover of Redemption Road
The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after EdgarAllan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America, based in New York City. They honor the best in mystery fiction of the previous year. John Hart is the only author in history to win the Edgar Award for two consecutive novels.  It's been five long years since his last novel but his new novel was worth waiting for.

I have read all of John Hart's books and waited a long 5 years for this one....and it was well worth waiting for! To me, this is the best of all of his books. I listened to it on tape on a long drive and missed a few turns along  my route because I was so engrossed in the book, that I quit listening to my GPS.

There are many story lines in this novel - Elizabeth, a police offer under investigation for a shooting; Adrian Wall, her mentor, who just got out of prison; Gideon who tries to shoot Adrian for what happened to his mother and Channing, a young crime victim are just a few of the characters who made this an immensely readable book. i can't tell you much about them without giving away parts of the book that need to be read. But I can tell you that their stories will have you rapidly turning pages to see how if and how they survived.

This is a dark and gritty novel and there is a lot of violence in it but I felt that it was all necessary to tell the story that the author wanted to tell. This is my favorite of this author's books and I highly recommend it.

Buy Redemption Road at Amazon

Susan Roberts, reviewer. Susan grew up in the Detroit area but after deciding that city life wasn't for her she moved to North Carolina after college. She and her husband have several acres of land and they enjoy gardening and canning vegetables in the summer. They travel extensively. Susan reads almost anything (and the piles of books in her house prove that) but her favorite genres are Southern fiction, women's fiction, and thrillers. Susan is a top 1% Goodreads Reviewer. You can connect with Susan on Facebook or Twitter.



Book info:
available formats: ebook and print (417 pages)
published: May 2016 by Thomas Dunne Books
ISBN13: 9780312380366
genres: crime, suspense




Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

September 4, 2016

Featured Book: Absalom's Daughters by Suzanne Feldman

cover of Absalom's Daughters
A spellbinding debut about half sisters, one black and one white, on a 1950s road trip through the American South

Self-educated and brown-skinned, Cassie works full time in her grandmother’s laundry in rural Mississippi. Illiterate and white, Judith falls for “colored music” and dreams of life as a big city radio star. These teenaged girls are half-sisters. And when they catch wind of their wayward father’s inheritance coming down in Virginia, they hitch their hopes to a road trip together to claim what’s rightly theirs.

In an old junk car, with a frying pan, a ham, and a few dollars hidden in a shoe, they set off through the American Deep South of the 1950s, a bewitchingly beautiful landscape as well as one bedeviled by racial strife and violence. Suzanne Feldman's Absalom’s Daughters combines the buddy movie, the coming-of-age tale, and a dash of magical realism to enthrall and move us with an unforgettable, illuminating novel.
~Goodreads.com


An excellent, engaging debut novel ~ delicateflower152

What a delightful read! ~ Katherine Schmidt

the characters are excellent - very developed and intelligent ~ kre8iv1

Start reading:



Buy Absalom's Daughters at Amazon


Get even more book news in your inbox by signing up for our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/mHTVL. Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

Shareahollic

Amazon Studio

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...