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October 21, 2017

Review: Christmas at Little Beach Street Bakery by Jenny Colgan

by Susan Roberts



This is the third book in the Little Beach Street Bakery trilogy by Jenny Colgan. It can be read as a stand-alone with no confusion but it's such a good series that I think you need to read them all!

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. A free book was provided for an honest review.

Christmas at Little Beach Street Bakery
October 2017; William Morrow; 9780062697844
ebook, audio, print (320 pages); holiday, romance
In Christmas at Little Beach Street Bakery, we go back to Mount Polbearne, a small isolated island in Cornwall, England just as the Christmas season is beginning. Polly is the town baker and is trying to keep up with demand from the townspeople plus spend enough time with her boyfriend Huckle and their pet Puffin Neil. Polly and Huckle are having problems with money after they bought a lighthouse to live in that won't stay warm in the winter and needs a lot of work done. To make extra money, Polly agrees to cater the Christmas celebration for her best friends very rich and very obnoxious husband. Anything that can go wrong with her plans and her romance, goes wrong during the weeks leading up to Christmas. Will Polly be able to overcome the stresses on her life and live happily ever after?

This is a great book to read full of love and family and the quirky and often very funny people of the town. I enjoyed the entire series and hate to know that this is the end of our stories about Polly and Huckle and their pet puffin.

Buy Christmas at the Little Beach Street Bakery at Amazon


Other Books by Jenny Colgan:

Little Beach Street Bakery 
Summer at Little Beach Street Bakery
The Cafe by the Sea
The Bookshop on the Corner


For more about Jenny, visit her website and her Facebook page, or follow her on Twitter.



Susan Roberts lives in North Carolina when she isn't traveling.  She and her husband enjoy traveling, gardening and spending time with their family and friends.  She reads almost anything (and the piles of books in her house prove that) but her favorite genres are Southern fiction, women's fiction, and thrillers. Susan is a top 1% Goodreads Reviewer. You can connect with her on Facebook, Goodreads or Twitter.



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October 20, 2017

The Important Role of Minor Characters

by Donna Huber



Minor characters are often overlooked or just given a cursory mention in reviews - "the secondary characters supported the main characters well". However, they often play a crucial role in plot and/or main character development. With the trend towards ensemble casts with multiple protagonists, minor characters are relegated to the shadows even more. Yet, without these characters, the stories wouldn't be half as good.

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I would love to know who some of your favorite minor characters are. Tell me in the comments!

The brilliance of minor characters is sometimes not realized until the book is re-read as the reader is rightfully caught up in the main actions and main characters. While other times we connect so well with a minor character that we hope that they get their own spin-off series.

(For the purpose of this article, I'm lumping supporting and minor characters together.)

Why Minor Characters are Special

In the opening paragraph of his Writer's Digest article What is a Minor Character: Understanding the Minor Characters' Role. Orson Scott Card states,

"You must know—and let your readers know—which characters are most important to the story (i.e. the major characters), so they’ll know which are worth following and caring about, and which will quickly disappear (i.e. the inconsequential placeholders)"

But truthfully, minor or supporting characters are often passing figures that for any number of reasons catch our eyes. We can come to care for them just as much as we do the main characters. In some instances, we are more drawn to a minor character than the main character. Just take a look at the number of fanfiction stories that have thrust a minor character into a leading role.

3 reasons we are drawn to minor characters:


  1. Delivers a particularly witty, poignant, or otherwise memorable line.
  2. We recognize something of ourselves in them.
  3. They provide key information on the plot or insight into the main characters, particularly true for foils.
I believe a great writer can and should breathe as much life into their minor characters as they do their main characters. As the saying goes, no man is an island unto himself. Therefore the more real the minor characters are the richer the whole story becomes. It will make readers want to delve back into a book again and again to mine for those undiscovered gems.

A Closer Look at Specific Minor Characters

Neville Longbottom and Luna Lovegood - Harry Potter

Harry Potter and the Order of the Pheonix
Arguably, the Harry Potter has one of the largest ensemble cast of characters and at times it is difficult to distinguish who is a minor and who is a major character. If we go with a strict definition of any character that is not Harry, Ron, or Hermoine is a minor character then we are left with a multitude of favorite characters - the whole Weasley clan, Colin Creavy, Kingsley Shackbolt, just to name a few.

For more two minor/supporting characters truly stand out - Neville and Luna. Luna became a fan favorite from the moment she graced the pages in the 5th Potter book, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Her strangeness is almost endearing, but it is really her uncanny ability to state what everyone is thinking but not willing to say out loud. She also provides comic relief at a point where the books become markedly darker. Interestingly, she is the only student that fights at the Ministry of Magic who is not a Gryffindor. She is a Ravenclaw, distinguished by their wisdom and cleverness. For many readers, she could represent their desire for labels not to define them.

I'm not sure in the beginning if Neville received the fan support he deserved. Sure he is singled out by Dumbledore at the end of the 1st book, but did that really mark him as a minor character to watch for? For me, Neville embodies the regular person. For most people, particularly at the age of 11 are awkward and more inept at things. How many of us still had our baby fat at that age? Or were the one that was targeted by the school bully? Probably for most of us, we wondered why such a boy was chosen for Gryffindor, surely he was more suited for Hufflepuff. Yet, by the end of the book 1 we see that it is what is on the inside, that which is often not seen, that really matters.

As we go through the series, Neville is always on the outskirts, tagging along. Like most of us, he wants to be part of the fight against evil but hasn't quite got the confidence to lead the charge. Or perhaps he didn't mind living in the shadows of Harry, Ron, and Hermoine. I know for me I will often let others lead, but like Neville, I'm capable of stepping up when necessary. It is probably why Neville's killing of the snake is so triumphant (and if you have only watched the movies, that scene is so much more satisfying in the book.)


Gallowglass and Sophie - All Souls Trilogy

A Discovery of Wtiches
It was actually during my recent re-read of Deborah Harkness's All Souls Trilogy that I really got to thinking about the importance of minor characters. The 2nd book in the series, Shadow of Night, is peppered with prominent historical characters, but it is two completely fictional minor characters that really jumped off the page for me.

Like Luna, Gallowglass is an instant fan favorite. So many fans have hoped for spin-off series or at least a novella featuring Gallowglass. After reading the series for the first time, hands down Gallowglass was my favorite character. However, it was during my recent re-read that I really took notice of Sophie.

I'm not sure if I have ever noticed her quite as much before. Compared to Gallowglass, Sophie does not have a lengthy part. However, her appearance towards the end of A Discovery of Witches is important in moving the plot forward. And not just because she brings with her the chess piece that allows them to know when and where they should go. It is probably the wit and cleverness in which she delivers her lines that makes her so memorable, some of which you won't recognize until you have completed the trilogy. But for this go around, for me, it was the levity that she inserted into the story that made me take notice. At the point she where she enters the story, everyone knows just how much danger Diana and Matthew are in and the characters are on the verge of letting fear paralyze or divide them. Sophie is like a breath of fresh air. I actually giggled at some of her lines. She doesn't diminish the seriousness of the situation, but instead provides a different perspective and infuses some hope into it.


All Characters are Important

For me, a great story has to have great characters. I will forgive a lot in the writing and plot if I fall in love with the characters. And it is often the minor and supporting characters that make or break the story - even if their role isn't fully realized during the first read.

What books have you read where the minor characters really enhance the story? Are there any minor characters who you have liked more than the main characters?
Donna Huber is an avid reader and natural encourager. She is the founder of Girl Who Reads and the author of how-to marketing book Secrets to a Successful Blog Tour.




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October 19, 2017

Review: In Real Life by Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang

by MK French

Anda is a gamer that was invited to Coarsegold Online. While there, she makes friends with others in her guild and even got to know a gold farmer from China. This makes her realize that games are more than just fun for people and that real life can be very different from a game.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. A free book was provided for an honest review.

In Real Life
October 2014; First Second; 978-1596436589
ebook, print (192 pages); YA, graphic novel
I was drawn to this book by the author as much as the subject matter because I'd heard Cory Doctorow was a great writer but hadn't read his work before.

The characters in the book are all kinds of gamers: those who play MMO's, those who make fun of casual cell phone gamers, those who play pen and paper RPG's like D&D, those who make fun of them, those who play board games and those who make fun of them. These intersect in all kinds of ways because gamers tend to cluster together and "other" the other kinds of gamers they see.

Anda, like every other gamer that starts out in an MMO, thinks badly of those that deliberately play the game to collect items and sell them online. It's against the Terms of Service in most online games but overseas has become a profession for many people. Because these are real issues that people face, it definitely makes you think about the consequences of gaming and an online presence.

The art by Jen Wang is beautifully done, with more vivid colors used for the online world. If you're a gamer, all of the little details involved in the panels definitely play off the interface in most MMO's: the health meter, a mana meter, the menus with item drops and gold. Even the character creation panels have lots of detail in them, it's almost a shame we don't get a chance to see the rest of it. There aren't a lot of background characters or illustration, perhaps to showcase that the game is in beta testing, but it also serves to focus on the characters themselves. There are real players behind the avatars, which can be easy to forget.

The only downside to this book was that it was far too short!

Buy In Real Life at Amazon

Born and raised in New York City, M.K. French started writing stories when very young, dreaming of different worlds and places to visit. She always had an interest in folklore, fairy tales, and the macabre, which has definitely influenced her work. She currently lives in the Midwest with her husband, three young children, and golden retriever.

Get even more book news in your inbox, sign up today! Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

October 18, 2017

Review: Last Christmas in Paris by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb #TLCBookTours and #LastChristmasInParis

by Susan Roberts


In August, 1914, England was at war and many men joined up to fight the Germans in a war that they believed would be over by Christmas.  Left behind in England were the families of the soldiers who were proud of their men for going off to war.  Four years later, the war still raged on and instead of joy and hope, the families in England and the soldiers themselves were full of despair and depression.  Last Christmas in Paris provides an up close look at the families and the soldiers during this 'war to end all wars'.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. A free book was provided for an honest review.

Last Christmas in Paris
October 2017; William Morrow; 978-0062562685
ebook, audio, print (400 pages); historical fiction
Last Christmas in Paris, written by Hazel Gaynor and Heather Webb, is told almost entirely by letters.  Most of the letters are between Evie and Thomas, her brother's best friend, but there are also letters between Evie and her brother Will, Evie and her best friend Alice and a few others.

As the novel begins, Evie, Alice, Will and Thomas have plans to spend Christmas in Paris after the war is over but as the years and the war drags on those plans get left behind. The happy young people at the beginning are soon worn out with the constant bad news from the front and they realize that this war will take a toll on them both physically and mentally.

Thomas longs to get home due to issues with his father's business and Evie yearns for a way that she can do more to help the war effort than by knitting gloves. As the letters between Evie and Thomas continue, they grow closer to each other and begin to fall in love.

Will their love be able to overcome all that is going on in their worlds?

Last Christmas in Paris is a fantastic book. By using letters, the reader could learn more about the personalities of the letter writers, their feeling with what was going on and their hope for their futures. I loved getting to know these characters and learning more about WWI.  Be prepared, there will be tears so have Kleenex close to you.

Buy Last Christmas in Paris at Amazon

About the Authors

Photo by Deasy Photographic
HAZEL GAYNOR is the New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of A Memory of Violets and The Girl Who Came Home, for which she received the 2015 RNA Historical Novel of the Year award. Her third novel The Girl from the Savoy was an Irish Times and Globe & Mail Canada bestseller, and was shortlisted for the BGE Irish Book Awards Popular Fiction Book of the Year.
Hazel was selected by US Library Journal as one of ‘Ten Big Breakout Authors’ for 2015 and her work has been translated into several languages.

Originally from Yorkshire, England, Hazel now lives in Ireland.
Find out more about Hazel at her website and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.


HEATHER WEBB writes historical fiction for Penguin, including her novels Becoming Josephine and Rodin’s Lover.

As a former military brat, Heather naturally grew up obsessed with travel, culture, and languages. She put her degrees to good use teaching high school French for nearly a decade before channeling these passions into fiction. When not writing, she flexes her foodie skills or looks for excuses to head to the other side of the world.
Heather is a member of the Historical Novel Society and the Women’s Fiction Writers Association.

Find out more about Heather at her website and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.


Also available at HarperCollins and Barnes & Noble



Susan Roberts lives in North Carolina when she isn't traveling.  She and her husband enjoy traveling, gardening and spending time with their family and friends. She reads almost anything (and the piles of books in her house prove that) but her favorite genres are Southern fiction, women's fiction and thrillers. Susan is a top 1% Goodreads Reviewer. You can connect with  her on Facebook, Goodreads or Twitter.


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October 17, 2017

Review: The Dream Keeper's Daughter by Emily Colin

by MK French

Isabel was crushed when her boyfriend Max abruptly disappeared after finding out she was pregnant. Six years prior to that, her mother had disappeared abruptly, too. Determined not to let it prevent her from being a good mother to her daughter Finn, she worked hard at graduate school to become an archaeologist. That peace is shattered when Max calls her while she's on a dig.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. A free book was provided for an honest review.

The Dream Keeper's Duaghter
July 2017; Ballantine Books; 978-1101884317
ebook, audio, print (480 pages)
world literarute, fantasy, romance
The points of view vary between Max and Isabel, and the story moves between present day South Carolina and 19th century Barbados prior to a slave rebellion. Some of the switches are clunky, and some of the very highly emotionally charged moments seem to come too easily.

I would have loved to see more of Finn and what she experienced; too many of her statements and visions really aren't explained or followed up on. It could be a function of Isabel's desire to avoid it, but even the therapist didn't really seem to dig too hard for it.

I would have expected a bit more of Isabel's work life as the book went on, but we didn't see any of it.
These inconsistencies were relatively minor, because I really did like Isabel and Max's stories. It didn't end the way I expected it to, but it was a fitting resolution for everyone involved.

Buy The Dream Keeper's Daughter at Amazon

Born and raised in New York City, M.K. French started writing stories when very young, dreaming of different worlds and places to visit. She always had an interest in folklore, fairy tales, and the macabre, which has definitely influenced her work. She currently lives in the Midwest with her husband, three young children, and golden retriever. 

Get even more book news in your inbox, sign up today! Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

October 16, 2017

Halloween Reads Part 2 - Red Queen by Christina Henry #MondayBlogs

by Elisabeth Scherer

I'm back with another Halloween read for you today. It is the second book in The Chronicles of Alice duology, Red Queen by Christina Henry.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site.

I will mention if you haven't read Alice then there are some unavoidable spoilers that this review will have just by the nature of it being the second book. You have been warned.
Red Queen by Christina Henry
July 2016; Ace; 978-0425266809
ebook, audio, print (291 pages);
Fantasy, Adult, Horror, Retelling

We return to the Old City where Alice and Hatcher have successfully confronted the Rabbit and both are now ready to go looking for Hatcher's daughter. Alice dreams of the green, rolling hill landscape beyond the Old City walls. As they exit the tunnel that leads away from the city, they see nothing but scorched landscape.

This book is much less hack and slash horror and much more psychological spooky and internal battle of Alice. Alice and Hatcher both encounter some strange things while they are traveling to try to find his daughter. At one point they are no longer together and Alice must travel on her own. She finds this village where all the children are being taken by an evil queen to her castle on the mountain.

It's a less of an action-packed book but it is a wonderfully written book, the new characters Alice meets are interesting and it certainly is an "adventure" of sorts. I will admit that when I read the title I was hoping for more of a Chess game with the mention of the red queen, a black king, and a white queen.  My favorite film adaptation is the 1985 TV movie version. In that movie, there is a section about Alice making her way across the chessboard landscaping to make it to the eighth square to become a queen. I wished this book had done a bit more with this and added the more dark twist to it.

There is more relationship in this book between Alice and Hatcher as well. Now that she seems to be out of the danger of Old City her adult mind is wandering even more towards a relationship with Hatcher. I don't find it an awful part of the plot. It felt natural when I thought about all they had been through together.

Overall, I would still recommend this book to folks who enjoy good writing skills and to those who are obsessed with everything Alice as I am. I'll be back for a third look at Christina Henry's dark and twisted books so stay tuned for my favorite of the three books!

Buy Red Queen at Amazon


Elisabeth Scherer grew up in a very small town in Minnesota but now lives in the lovely Pacific Northwest where she spends most of her time raising her two young children. She and her husband have a large collection of books that takes a good space of their small condo. When she's not reading she has a variety of hobbies that include crocheting, drawing, baking, cooking, and movie watching. She is currently obsessed with making French Macarons and other baked deliciousness! You can also find her blogging at http://kitchenstoriesetc.blogspot.com

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Review: How to Make Life Nice by Sarah Ménage

by Susan Roberts

It's always nice to read books with characters older than 50 who are still trying to figure out their lives.

Amazon affiliate links are used in this post. A free book was provided for an honest review.

How to Make Life Nice
February 2017; Better & Better; ebook (346 pgs)
women's fiction 

I thought that the character of Georgina was very well done and well balanced. She wasn't a perfect person and her faults were on full display as well as the good parts of her personality. How to Make Life Nice is a coming of middle age novel for a woman who still didn't have life figured out but was definitely working on it.

This was an excellent debut novel and I look forward to future books from this author.

About the Book:

"A compelling examination of love, loss and family ties... beautiful, assured, lyrical... complex, amibitious and clever." Journalist and academic Charlie Lee-Potter

A coming-of-middle-age tragicomedy in which our empty-nesting, partnerless, parentless, jobless but resolutely cheerful heroine has to confront the awful truth that life isn't always nice and being nice doesn't always work.

The family home has to be sold. A flat full of boxes, a garden choked with ivy. Contrary to her brother Will's advice, Georgina proposes to sort it all out by herself. She has underestimated the power of the past. Buried alone with 200 years' worth of accumulated stuff - letters, photographs, odds, sods and bits and bobs - she begins to lose touch with the present and her own world begins to dissolve.

Set in the Bristol of nowish, and Stratford-upon-Avon during the summer of '76.

Buy How to Make Life Nice at Amazon


Susan Roberts lives in North Carolina when she isn't traveling. She and her husband enjoy traveling, gardening and spending time with their grandson. Susan reads almost anything (and the piles of books in her house prove that) but her favorite genres are Southern fiction, women's fiction, and thrillers. Susan is a top 1% Goodreads Reviewer. You can connect with Susan on Facebook.

Get even more book news in your inbox, sign up today! Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

October 15, 2017

10 Questions with Allan Topol, author of WASHINGTON POWER PLAY

Washington Power Play is Allan Topol’s 13th novel of international intrigue. Two of them, Spy Dance and Enemy My Enemy, were national bestsellers. His novels have been translated into Japanese, Portuguese and Hebrew. One was optioned and three are in development for movies. More recently, many of his books focused on his Craig Page series, including The Argentine Triangle, The Russian Endgame, Spanish Revenge, China Gambit and Italian Divide.

In addition to his fiction writing, Allan Topol co-authored a two-volume legal treatise entitled Superfund Law and Procedure. A graduate of Yale University Law School, he is a partner in a major Washington law firm, and has traveled extensively researching locations for his novels. He wrote a weekly column for Military.com and has published articles in numerous periodicals including the New York Times, Washington Post, and Yale Law Journal. He also has blogged for Huffington Post. For more information, visit www.allantopol.com.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site.

How is WASHINGTON POWER PLAY timely in today's political world?

Washington Power Play
May 2017; SelectBooks; 978-1590794258
ebook, print (320); political thriller
Washington Power Play deals with an effort by the Chinese government to influence a US presidential election. Right now, no topic could be more timely than a foreign government's attempt to influence a US presidential election. The lead story in the media day after day is whether Russia influenced the election of President Trump.  Two years ago when I wrote Washington Power Play, dealing with China's effort to control the election of the US president, I had no idea that my book, when published, would be so timely.

How did you decide to write about a plot initiated by a foreign government to support a candidate for President of the United States?

I am and have been an attorney in Washington and a partner in one of the most influential law firms in this city. Though I have never held a position in government, I have been on the fringe of our nation's political process.  In this position, I have observed how vulnerable our presidential election process is to outside manipulation by those with large amounts of money who want to elect a president who will support their agenda. Starting with this fact, it was a relatively small leap to ask what if the Chinese government wanted to manipulate the election to put someone in the White House who would support their agenda. That is the premise of Washington Power Play.

Does it mirror what is being discussed about Russia today and President Trump?

Washington Power Play goes one step beyond what is being discussed about President Trump and Russia in the media. In Washington Power Play, the foreign government involved, namely China, has selected the individual, General Cartwright, an American military hero, who they would like to be US president, encouraged him to run, and arranged financing for his campaign.  Cartwright, a complex character, does not view himself as a traitor.  Rather, he is convinced that he is advancing an agenda in co-ordination with the Chinese which he believes is in the best interests of the US.


Why did you choose to write about China?

As the twenty-first century is evolving, China has emerged as the primary rival of the United States economically, militarily, and diplomatically. The Economist wrote on April 1, 2017, that China is challenging the US for the world leadership it has exercised since the end of World War II. In this effort, the Chinese have launched wide-ranging spy efforts in the United States. Two examples were uncovered recently.  One involved a high-level career official with the State Department who accepted cash and gifts for many years to pass classified US political and economic information to the Chinese.  The other involved an American energy engineer procuring nuclear know-how for the Chinese.  These are only two examples of real-life Chinese espionage in the US which is a critical part of Washington Power Play.

How do you research topics for your book?

I read a great deal about history and geopolitical events throughout the world. I also travel to foreign locations to obtain background for my novels. I have been to China, France, Israel, Italy, Spain, Argentina, and Japan, among other countries researching my novels.  Also, the internet is a wonderful source of information that enhances research.

For Washington Power Play, I not only visited China, but immersed myself in China political, military and strategic matters both in books and on the internet. I spoke with people possessing China expertise.  In addition, I read biographies of Chinese leaders such as Deng and Mao to understand what was motivating them as they led the Chinese effort to surpass the US.

What is your background in understanding power in the Beltway?

For more than thirty years I have been a partner in one of Washington's most influential law firms.  In my work, I have argued in the Supreme Court and many lower courts. I have dealt with numerous governmental agencies. I have spent time and worked with individuals holding positions at the highest levels of the US government and some foreign governments as well as those in the media.  From this close contact and involvement, I have observed the exercise of power inside the Beltway. I have watched the unfolding of the never-ending crises, including infighting, struggles for power, the pursuit of personal agendas, corruption, and sexual scandals that grip Washington in every Administration.  All of this was very helpful in writing Washington Power Play.

What motivates you to write as this is now your thirteenth book of international intrigue?

I write novels because I care deeply about geopolitical affairs. Fiction is a very effective vehicle to convey ideas about geopolitical issues.  My goal is to entertain readers with page-turning suspenseful novels, with strong characters, male and female, like Kelly Cameron, the protagonist of Washington Power Play. At the same time, I want to educate readers, not with characters who lecture but with the unfolding story.

What's the best advice you received about writing that you still use?

The best advice is: make your novel a page-turner, make your readers want to know what happens next, and create compelling characters. To achieve this, I recommend that you start with a three-sentence synopsis of your story.  Then prepare a detailed outline, scene by scene.  Mine are typically 40 or 50 pages.  When you write, you may not follow this outline precisely, but it is critical to have the blueprint.  You would not build a house without detailed plans. Once you have the outline, prepare profiles of your three or four main characters, what they look like, their backgrounds, personalities, and strengths and weaknesses. Make them compelling.  You must get to know them yourself.  When you have done all of these things, you can begin to write.  Also, write your first draft in a white heat---straight through to the end. Do not revise until you have completed the first draft.

How did you choose your characters names?

For the names of the Chinese characters in Washington Power Play, when I was at the Aspen Music Festival, I studied the names of the Chinese musicians in the programs for various events.  For foreign names, I use history books about the country as a source.  More generally, I try to pick names which seem to me like the characters they represent.  Occasionally, I use the name of someone I know.  For example, in Spy Dance, I used Sagit for the name of my main Israeli intelligence agent. Sagit was the name of a good friend of my daughter in school; her father had been a military hero.

Any more books on the horizon? Where will it take place?

My next, fourteenth novel, will again feature Craig Page and Elizabeth Crowder as the protagonists.  They were the lead characters in five of my prior novels but did not appear in Washington Power Play. That next novel will be focused on Hungary and much of the book will take place in Budapest which I visited last fall. Part of the action will also take place in Paris, Tel Aviv, Moscow, and Washington. After that, I am developing a story that revolves around Iran.

Buy Washington Power Play at Amazon


Meet Allan Topol in person at one of his upcoming book signing events:

Saturday, November 4
International Spy Museum 800 F Street, NW, Wash DC
11-4 p.m.

Saturday, November 11
Barnes & Noble Phil., PA, Rittenhouse Square
11-3 p.m.

Saturday, December 2
Barnes & Noble Ellicott City, MD
11-3 p.m.

Wednesday, November 29
University Club Washington, D.C.
6-8 p.m.

Sunday, December 3
Barnes & Noble Tysons Corner, VA
11-3 p.m.

Monday, December 10
Barnes & Noble Calabasas, CA
Noon-3 p.m.

Get even more book news in your inbox, sign up today! Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

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