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October 28, 2017

Review: Dark Screams Volume 8 by Kealan Patrick Burke, Frank Darabont, Bentley Little

by MK French

This is a collection of six short stories curated by horror editors.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. A free book was provided for an honest review.

Dark screams
October 2017; Hydra; ebook (153 pages)
short stories, horror
"Walpulski's Typewriter" opens this collection, and it's every writer's nightmare: a deal with a demon to write bestsellers, which backfires spectacularly.

"The Boy" is creepy in an entirely different way. Instead of being dark and bloody and broody, this story takes place in a pristine suburban community, with a clique of stereotypical PTA moms who feel that there is one particular boy that drags down the perfection of the neighborhood. The action is sudden, and the horror is in the subtle way the story ends.

"Tumor" and "India Blue" both have elements of gory horror stories, but neither of them left me particularly horrified or disturbed. I think it's because there's a distance between the characters and the horror parts so that it's almost too far removed from the reader's awareness. I don't feel invested in any of the characters or events in those two stories.

"Twisted and Gnarled" is one that drew me in out of morbid fascination, as it chronicles a serial killer as he leaves bodies along the California coast. This is more of a suspense story as it goes on, and I enjoyed the climactic fight scene.

"The Palaver" is a nested story-within-a-story tale, which doesn't quite work as well for me. I actually enjoy the embedded story more than the framing one, though it's set up in such a way that the reader knows the events in the embedded story are meant to happen again.

I raced through the stories in this collection and found it an easy, quick read and in keeping with the Halloween spirit.

Buy Dark Screams Volume 8 at Amazon


Born and raised in New York City, M.K. French started writing stories when very young, dreaming of different worlds and places to visit. She always had an interest in folklore, fairy tales, and the macabre, which has definitely influenced her work. She currently lives in the Midwest with her husband, three young children, and golden retriever. 


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The Welcome Home Diner by Peggy Lampman

by Susan Roberts



Warning: Don't read this book if you are hungry or else have something close to your reading spot to snack on. Actually, even if you aren't hungry, you will be after you read about the wonderful food served at the diner. Added bonus - recipes at the end of the book on how to make some of the wonderful food from the diner!

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site.

The Welcome Home Diner
October 2017; Lake Union Publishing
978-1542047821; ebook, audio print (352 pages)
women's fiction
I loved this book for several reasons - first, the personal reason. I grew up in the suburbs of Detroit (on the east side) and went to college in the city so Detroit is a special place to me. I want to see it come back to being the great city that it once was and the revitalization of Detroit is one of the underlying themes of this book.

Second, I love to read books that weave current issues of the day into it and this one does a great job of doing just that. Lampman writes about human trafficking, racial issues, drugs and white flight from the city to the suburbs among other topics.

Third, I loved the characters in this novel. Two cousins buy an old gutted out diner in the city and try to become part of the neighborhood. They are met with resistance from the old time residents, no matter how hard they try but they keep trying. Not only are Addie and Samantha fantastic main characters but they are surrounded by great secondary characters who also work at the diner.

And lastly, as mentioned earlier, the descriptions of the food served at the diner are awesome.

This is a fantastic well-written book about two women who are trying to do their part to make not only their neighborhood but also a beautiful city come back to life again. It's a story about love and friendship, loyalty, hope and faith.

Buy The Welcome Diner at Amazon

Also available at Books-A-Million | Barnes & Noble

Other books by Peggy Lampman


 About the Author 

Peggy Lampman was born and raised in Birmingham, Alabama. After earning a bachelor’s degree in communications—summa cum laude—from the University of Michigan, she moved to New York City, where she worked as a copywriter and photographer for a public-relations firm. When she returned to Ann Arbor, her college town, she opened a specialty foods store, the Back Alley Gourmet. Years later, she sold the store and started writing a weekly food column for the Ann Arbor News and MLive. Lampman’s first novel, The Promise Kitchen, published in 2016, garnered several awards and accolades. She is married and has two children. She also writes the popular blog www.dinnerfeed.com.

Susan Roberts lives in North Carolina when she isn't traveling.  She and her husband enjoy traveling, gardening and spending time with their family and friends.  She reads almost anything (and the piles of books in her house prove that) but her favorite genres are Southern fiction, women's fiction, and thrillers. Susan is a top 1% Goodreads Reviewer. You can connect with her on Facebook, Goodreads or Twitter.


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October 27, 2017

Review: The Right Kind of Rogue by Valerie Bowman

by MK French

The Right Kind of Rogue is the final book in the "Playful Brides" series, but the others don't necessarily need to be read prior to this one. It certainly helps you understand the relationships between characters mentioned, but this book focuses on Meg Timmons and Viscount Hart Highgate, who is finally ready to settle down and get married.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. A free book was provided for an honest review.

The Right Kind of Rogue
October 2017; St Martin's Press; 9781250121714
ebook, print (320 pages); regemcy romance
Meg had a crush on him since age sixteen, but their families loathe each other and she has no money to her name at all. Her only hope to catch his attention is to enlist the help of her best friend Sarah, his sister, and Lady Lucy. Sarah doesn't realize Meg hopes to attract Hart, and Lucy is only too willing to play matchmaker and concoct outrageous schemes.

This is a fun Regency romance, and the twist in the story isn't that the hero or heroine are in danger. There's the added incentive of Meg's family leaving England to speed up the timetable, but it isn't the tension that usually arises when one of the pair has to save the other. Instead, the emotional context is the barrier between them, and both have to learn how to communicate with each other to make it work.

As the reader, you know exactly what's going on behind the misunderstanding, making you want to shake the characters to just talk to each other. That's the one downside to that kind of trope keeping people apart, though it's understandable why they do it. That also sets them up for a very dramatic finale, which makes up for the frustration.

Buy The Right Kind of Rogue at Amazon

Born and raised in New York City, M.K. French started writing stories when very young, dreaming of different worlds and places to visit. She always had an interest in folklore, fairy tales, and the macabre, which has definitely influenced her work. She currently lives in the Midwest with her husband, three young children, and golden retriever. 

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October 26, 2017

Review: Hanna Who Fell from the Sky by Christopher Meades

by Susan Roberts


This is a coming of age novel with a bit of magic.  It’s about a family in Clearhaven.  Everyone who lives in this town is part of a cult.  It’s about questioning what you’ve been taught for your whole life and trying to make decisions that are the best for the individual.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. 

Hanna Who fell from the sky
September 2017; Park Row; 978-0778328735
ebook, audio, print (352 pages); literary 
Hanna is 17 years old and lives in a dilapidated house with her father, his 4 wives and 14 children.  According to the rules of the cult, when a girl turns 18, she marries one of the older men in the cult and becomes part of his household with his other wives.  Only one boy in each family is allowed stay in town, the rest are sent away so that there is no competition for the 18 year old girls.  Right before Hanna turns 18, she is told by the cult leader that she’ll marry one of her father’s friends who is three times older than her and become his 5th wife. Hanna begins to question the plans for her life, especially after she meets Daniel, who is being groomed to be the future cult leader despite his reluctance.  There is also a bit of magic, something that I don’t usually like but it fit perfectly in this book.

NOTE;  THIS BOOK IS LISTED AS YA BUT I DON’T THINK IT SHOULD BE READ BY YOUNGER TEENS.

“With lush, evocative prose, award-winning author Christopher Meades takes readers on an emotional journey into a fascinating, unknown world—and, along the way, brilliantly illuminates complexities of faith, identity and how our origins shape who we are.”

Buy Hanna Who Fell From the Sky at Amazon

About the Author

Christopher Meades is a Vancouver author whose novel The Last Hiccup won the 2013 Canadian Authors Association Award for Fiction.

Connect with Christopher
Website | Facebook | Twitter

Also available at Books-A-Million and Barnes & Noble


Susan Roberts lives in North Carolina when she isn't traveling.  She and her husband enjoy traveling, gardening and spending time with their family and friends.  She reads almost anything (and the piles of books in her house prove that) but her favorite genres are Southern fiction, women's fiction and thrillers. Susan is a top 1% Goodreads Reviewer. You can connect with  her on Facebook.


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October 25, 2017

Review: Bag Exchange by Trishna Damodar

by MK French

A shy and introverted young woman, Tia found it easier to have a meaningful conversation online than in person with strangers. Sameer was arrogant and found it difficult to trust others with emotions; if anything, emotions were a sign of weakness. The two met by chance in an airport lounge on the way to Delhi, and a luggage mixup ensured that they would meet again.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. A free book was provided for an honest review.

Bag Exchange
Augaust 2016; Olympia Publishers
978-1848977259; print (186 pages)
romance, world literature
As an American, there were some phrases and figures of speech that I was a little unfamiliar with. The emotional baggage that both Tia and Sameer felt were very familiar, however. Tia lacked self confidence and relied on her mother and close friends for emotional support. Sameer was full of himself in front of others but doubted his ability to truly connect with others. Both were scarred by past traumas, and found themselves wanting to change in order to be in a relationship.

While I'm not much of a fan of the "change your personality to maintain a relationship trope," here it was less of them changing who they were but becoming who they had once been before retreating behind emotional walls. It was great to see such supportive relationships around them, where no one was truly the "bad guy" when there were multiple assumptions and miscommunications.

The resolution of Sameer's problems were a little too pat, and didn't feel real. A lifetime of resentment and hurt can't be erased completely in a single conversation, and some of the conflicts he had with Tia were resolved relatively quickly. That made it seem like as long as the man is rich, his flaws can be overlooked. Still, I hadn't read many books set in India before, and the look into the culture was lovely. There really are more similarities than differences when matters of the heart are concerned.

Buy Bag Exchange at Amazon

Born and raised in New York City, M.K. French started writing stories when very young, dreaming of different worlds and places to visit. She always had an interest in folklore, fairy tales, and the macabre, which has definitely influenced her work. She currently lives in the Midwest with her husband, three young children, and golden retriever. 

Get even more book news in your inbox, sign up today! Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

Candy Coloured Clown

by Ross M. Kitson


Given the less than subtle appearance of pumpkins and cobwebs everywhere I go it seemed an appropriate time to post about my re-kindled love affair with perhaps the greatest fantasy-horror series in modern comics: Neil Gaiman's 'Sandman.'

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Back in 1988 one of my old friends gave me the heads up on a limited series by DC comics called Black Orchid, beautifully painted by Dave McKean and written by then newbie Neil Gaiman. The comic tied into the revitalised Swamp Thing series that Alan Moore had been writing, and I loved the in-depth literary style to the work. Gaiman had written only a few things by then (one in Imagine, a DnD magazine from the UK) but presumably impressed DC/ Vertigo enough to be handed over the title, Sandman, to do with as he wished. What he then did was take a tired superhero character and… well, totally mess with the genre.

Image from https://nerdist.com/
It was a great era for comics in the late 80s: Alan Moore, Grant Morrison, Jamie Delano, with the maturing of storylines and topics evident in both the mainstream titles, but also in the new imprints such as Vertigo. To me it is Gaiman's Sandman that stood the test of time, and my comic loving friend convinced me to part with my hard earned cash (I worked in 1989 as a silver service waiter whilst studying A-levels at the time) to buy the first issues of the comic, which I still have tucked away.

Nearly thirty years on, and having dipped into and out of them erratically over the years, I've decided to re-start reading the entire series. Handily now it's collected as a ten book series, and the first two give some idea about the style of the epic series. In the first book, Preludes and Nocturnes, we encounter the protagonist, Morpheus. Chalk-white skin with hair like Robert Smith from the Cure, we discover Morpheus is one of the Endless—a group of deities representing some aspect of being. Morpheus is also named Dream and has siblings such as Death (the coolest character in comics ever), Delerium, and Desire ('D' was a favoured letter in the Endless house, I assume). When we first meet him he is trapped by an arcane ritual and his totems stolen, and the first book involves him seeking them back. This involves encounters with other DC heroes of the time, but after this the series really diverges away from the mainstream DC Universe, explaining away the superhero Sandman (a Jack Kirby creation from the 70s) as a creation of escaped creatures from the Dreaming (his realm).

Image from https://www.goodreads.com/
(original from Sandman 1: Preludes and Nocturnes)
What Gaiman created with the Sandman went on to be truly epic. Often the story arcs would involve Morpheus fairly peripherally, and not always as a benign character. It becomes clear as we read through that Morpheus has been an arrogant and often callous individual in the past, and many story threads relate to his redemption of past wrongs. Throughout this Gaiman creates a tangible mythology—of escaped nightmares, a novel interpretation of Hell and Lucifer, a dreamscape over which he rules, and the saga of the Endless as well as other traditional mythologies (such as Norse and Egyptian). His work balanced stand-alone short stories with multi-part tales (one being 13 parts), and at the time it really pushed the medium into the quality of mainstream literature. For me, the true skill was how Neil Gaiman brought in aspects of so many genres and wove them into a fresh perspective on mythology and fantasy. The mature aspects of the series, with serial killer crime, and disinhibited murderers, were never so horrific as to distract from the great prose and, importantly, the evolving characterisation. It's no mean feat to achieve this in the comic medium, and it puts the comic up there with some of the modern greats like Maus, Persepolis, Watchmen, V for Vendetta, and The Invisibles.

The Sandman ran to 75 issues, until 1996, and I strayed from the path in the 90s and never finished it. So swearing an oath to the Pumpkin King, I vow to complete the odyssey of Gaiman's first major work and see it through. Of course, Gaiman went on to branch from the comics genre and into many other areas. His books draw upon the themes and style he explored in the Sandman. You can see this, especially in the American Gods book, with the juxtaposition of old gods (from Norse, Egyptian, and Slavic mythology) and new (such as Media), and Anansi Boys, which also featured Mr. Nancy from the former novel. His love of fairy tales given a darker twist is evident in Stardust, and in Coraline—perhaps the scariest children's book I'd read in a long time (and for once a superb film adaptation of a book).

Image from film of Coraline via www.slate.com
I remain glad that Sandman has not yet stepped into the celluloid/ televisual world. That's not me being precious about it, but most who've read the comics agree that it would be hard to capture the nuance and idiosyncrasy of the comics on TV. When I see shows such as Supernatural, Once Upon a Time or Grimm I can't help but see Gaiman's influence in them, and ironically Eric Kripke, creator of Supernatural, was once tipped for adapting the Sandman series. To me, it could only work as a series, preferably by HBO, CW or even Netflix. Time will tell, and I'd be surprised if it remains un-filmed.
So wish me luck on my epic journey, and if the post has made you curious why not join me and start reading the collection. Even if you're no comics fan perhaps you'll appreciate the wide-reaching plotlines and the evolution of the talent of Neil Gaiman.

'Never trust the storyteller. Only trust the story.' : Neil Gaiman: Sandman 6—Fables and Reflections.


Cover of Sandman issue 1 (1989) from
http://www.davemckean-collector.co.uk/page_864008.html

Ross Kitson is a doctor, occasional blogger, full-time geek, and sporadic author of fantasy and YA sci-fi. Connect with Ross on Twitter.


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October 24, 2017

Review: A Pawn of Destiny by Harold Boardman

by MK French

Darquin is a young man living in the Roman Empire who is banished from home. He is all but conscripted into the army along with his cousin, and soon travels to faraway lands he didn't think he would ever visit.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. A free book was provided for an honest review.

A Pawn of Destiny
September 2017; 978-1520908878
ebook, print (292 pages); historical fiction
The book opens with Darquin's father Kirian being tricked into slavery, his brief time fighting in Spartacus' slave army, and then escape into the countryside. Prior to reading this, I was only aware of Spartacus through the television show. (Very, very not for children, by the way!) As a result, a few of the names and concepts from the early chapters were somewhat familiar. There really wasn't any description at all in the beginning, and events were glossed over with no detail whatsoever, making me feel more like I was reading a history textbook than a novel. I understand that Kirian isn't the main character, but the rest of the book has the similar dry feel to it. Even sex scenes described in detail feels distant, and there is little emotional connection with the characters despite it later being referred to as "a passionate love." More emotion is shown through conversations, which are altogether too brief and scattered sparsely throughout the text.

This novel is obviously very researched, and it's richly detailed. However, the details are more in the locations, movement of troops and how the Roman empire is woven together. There are few physical descriptions of characters, occasionally hair, skin or eye colors, or distinguishing features. Otherwise, characters are referred to by name as actions are flatly given out, one after the other. Even the battles described don't seem very tense or emotionally engaging for me as a reader. For example, we get this: "Sword clashed with sword and the air was filled with grunts, groans, and screams of both men and horses." In the very next sentence, the bandits retreat and leave behind one hundred dead. This could have been a great opportunity to really see what the fighting is like, to feel what they're going through and get a sense of the desperation of those hundred dying men. Instead, it's little more than a footnote that could have been left out. The entire novel is written in this manner, making it very difficult for me to care about any of the events described.

Buy A Pawn of Destiny at Amazon

Born and raised in New York City, M.K. French started writing stories when very young, dreaming of different worlds and places to visit. She always had an interest in folklore, fairy tales, and the macabre, which has definitely influenced her work. She currently lives in the Midwest with her husband, three young children, and golden retriever.

Get even more book news in your inbox, sign up today! Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

October 23, 2017

The Crows of Beara by Julie Christine Johnson #MondayBlogs #TLCBookTours #TheCrowsOfBeara

by Susan Roberts

This is a wonderful new novel about one of my favorite places to visit – Ireland.  The author does such descriptive writing about Ireland that I feel like I’ve been on a mini vacation.  Ireland and environmental issues are the central themes of this novel but the relationship between the two main characters – Annie and Daniel is what makes this novel so memorable.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. 

The Crows of beara
September 2017; Ashland Creek Press
978-1618220479; ebook, print; women's fiction
Annie and Daniel are both flawed people trying to forgive themselves for their pasts and define their future selves.  Annie is an alcoholic who is just out of rehab. Her marriage is falling apart and the PR company she works for is getting tired of giving her second chances. Her last chance to keep her job is a PR job in Ireland trying to convince a small town that the new jobs that will be provided by a copper mine are more important than the environmental problems that the mine would cause.  The first person she meets in Ireland is Daniel, a metal artist, who is fighting with the demons in his past and working with many of the people in town who oppose the mining operation.  Despite their differences, Annie and Daniel are drawn to each other. The more Annie sees of the beautiful Beara peninsula, the more she questions the mine owners plans to destroy the environment. Will Annie and Daniel be able to forgive themselves for their pasts and discover happiness in their future?

This a wonderful story about love and redemption, the beautiful country of Ireland and the importance of family.

Buy The Crows of Beara at Amazon

About the Author

Julie Christine Johnson’s short stories and essays have appeared in journals including Emerge Literary Journal; Mud Season Review; Cirque: A Literary Journal of the North Pacific Rim; Cobalt; and River Poets Journal. Her work has also appeared in the print anthologies Stories for Sendai; Up, Do: Flash Fiction by Women Writers; and Three Minus One: Stories of Love and Loss. She holds undergraduate degrees in French and psychology and a master’s in international affairs. Julie leads writing workshops and seminars and offers story/developmental editing and writer coaching services.
Named a “standout debut” by Library Journal, “very highly recommended” by Historical Novels Review, and “delicate and haunting, romantic and mystical” by bestselling author Greer Macallister, Julie’s debut novel In Another Life (Sourcebooks) went into a second printing three days after its February 2016 release. A hiker, yogi, and swimmer, Julie makes her home in northwest Washington state.

Find out more about Julie at her website, and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter. You can also follow her on Instagram and Pinterest.

Also available at Barnes & Noble

Susan Roberts lives in North Carolina when she isn't traveling.  She and her husband enjoy traveling, gardening and spending time with their family and friends.  She reads almost anything (and the piles of books in her house prove that) but her favorite genres are Southern fiction, women's fiction and thrillers. Susan is a top 1% Goodreads Reviewer. You can connect with  her on Facebook.


Get even more book news in your inbox, sign up today! Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

October 22, 2017

Review: Lawless Series by William Sutton

by MK French

A couple of months ago, we featured an excerpt from William Sutton's latest book in the Lawless series. Today, I review all three books in his Victoria crime series.

Amazon affiliate links are used on this site. Free books were provided for an honest review.


Lawless and the Devil of Euston Square (Lawless Book 1) by William Sutton

Lawless and the Devil of Euston Square
May 2016; Titan Books; 978-1785650093
ebook, print (464 pages); historical, crime
Novice detective Campbell Lawless is new to Scotland Yard after helping out with a burst hydraulic pump in the winter of 1859. From there, he discovers more about the underbelly of London, the poor and the elite, and uncovers a plot involving revolutionaries, actresses, and even the royal family. Much of his inquiry has to do with Berwick Skelton, a poor man that became an activist that had disappeared. Finding him forces Lawless to unravel a far more complex network of people and secrets than he thought was possible.

The novel is a Victorian crime drama and is written in that style and with that pacing. The language used reflects the period, and the story is told mostly through Lawless' point of view, with accents from newspapers, quotes from notable figures of the day (Charles Dickens and Karl Marx especially).

It's very slow going, and the book is just over 500 pages. This allows you get a feel for the time period and the characters, but it's very dragged out in a lot of places. Yes, the entire book spans over three years, but at some points in the book, it really feels like it and there's not much action or investigation going on.

It definitely gives you a fantastic feel for the time period, and you get a chance to see how investigations were done. There is so much detail in here, you really get immersed in it. If that's the kind of period mystery that you like, this is the book for you.

Buy Lawless and the Devil of Euston Square at Amazon


Lawless and the Flowers of Sin (Lawless Book 2) by William Sutton

Lawless and the Flowers of Sin
July 2016; Titan Books; 978-1785650116
ebook, print (464 pages); historical, crime
After the events at Euston Square, Detective Lawless continued to work in Scotland Yard. He was assigned a number of drab cases before being reassigned as the Inspector of Vice. In this position, he has to make a tally of all the bordellos in London, and collect the stories of the women who work there. Along the way, he became friends with an elderly musician that established a foundation for fallen women, in an effort to give women an option if they wanted to leave the bordellos. However, powerful men throughout London frequent the higher end bordellos and bookshops, and have no interest in letting Lawless unravel the network they painstakingly put together.

This novel refers to some events in the first one, such as Lawless's resentment at being stuck doing filing and paperwork after he had unraveled the plot of the first mystery. He isn't very interested in this new position as Inspector of Vice, but he makes a number of friends (of sorts) with a few of the prostitutes and honestly cares what happens to them. A great number of his illusions are shattered in the process, which leads him to look further into how a good number of them fell into the oldest profession.

There is no detail given regarding some of the stories, so we're left to fill in the blanks with our own dirty imagination. It's a clever way to go about it because even the outlines of stories and the hints that are given can be too heartrending to imagine someone actually living through.

It's just as atmospheric as the first novel and takes us further into the underbelly of Victorian London.

The story moves along much faster here and doesn't feel as weighed down. The final sections explain the tangled stories of the musician and the woman Lawless saw him with, and seem to serve as an epilogue of sorts. It doesn't explain any future events, not like the final sections of the first novel, but is a gentler conclusion to the tale.

Buy Lawless and the Flowers of Sin at Amazon


Lawless and the House of Electricity (Lawless Book 3) by William Sutton

August 2017; Titan Books; 978-1785650130
ebook, print (464 pages); historical, crime
Sergeant Campbell Lawless investigates a body that was found on a ship after being dead for years, as well as a series of explosions that don't initially seem connected. The Earl of Roxbury manufactures weapons for England, and the tensions between England and Europe are mounting. Lawless is sent by the Home Office to investigate the explosions, so he sends the ex-street urchin Molly to Roxbury's estate to investigate his estate, which includes a number of experiments, electrical contraptions, and a number of scientists working with him.

Instead of being primarily Lawless's point of view with a smattering of telegrams or newspaper clippings, the story here bounces between his point of view, Molly's letters and telegrams, and some missives from Ruth Villiers. Because Lawless has to stay in London, this helps us see what happens at Roxbury's estate. Just as in the second novel in this series, a lot of it is then left to our imagination from the hints given in the text.

The alternating texts do reveal the fact that there are two mysteries at play at once, some of which can be guessed ahead of time.

This story is just as tangled as prior ones, yet feels less oppressively dense. Once the stories fully unfold in the later sections of the novel, they're revealed to be almost gothic in nature. I found this novel to be the most enjoyable of the three.

Buy Lawless and the House of Electricity at Amazon



Born and raised in New York City, M.K. French started writing stories when very young, dreaming of different worlds and places to visit. She always had an interest in folklore, fairy tales, and the macabre, which has definitely influenced her work. She currently lives in the Midwest with her husband, three young children, and golden retriever.


Get even more book news in your inbox, sign up today! Girl Who Reads is an Amazon advertising affiliate; a small commission is earned when purchases are made at Amazon using any Amazon links on this site. Thank you for supporting Girl Who Reads.

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