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January 7, 2016

Why You Should Leave a Comment

by Donna Huber

You just read a great article online and you thought to yourself 'that's a great read' and you might even share it to Facebook or Twitter, but then you move on.

But the author of the article never knew you liked their article. Sure they can see that it was shared so many times (though it is a bit more difficult to track that on Twitter now), but they don't know that you personally shared it and enjoyed their article.

That is why it is important to leave a comment.

You might not think that leaving a "great article" comment is important or even worth the effort. However, I can tell you as a writer there is nothing that puts a smile on my face faster than seeing someone leaving a comment, even if it is just "great article".

Why is it important and has me doing the happy dance?

Because it let me know, one, a real person read my article. I can look all day at the numbers my metrics. But some of those numbers are robots or scammers. And the ones that aren't are just hypothetical people that I know only what the numbers tell me. But to see a real comment (as oppose to the scammers that want to get a link on my blog), lets me know that there is a real person reading what I wrote and did enjoy it and didn't just mindlessly share what everyone else is sharing.

While you might think leaving a comment saying "great article" is meaningless. It is not. I know the time you took to actually type that comment. I participate often in a weekly meme and it takes effort to leave a comment. And you know what? Most of comments are "that book sounds interesting" and "not really the book I typically read". Not really profound statements.

So the next time you read an article you enjoy consider leaving a comment to let the writer know exactly that. Your comment doesn't have to "add" to the conversation or be some profound statement to be appreciated by the writer.

And you know what else? When one person comments it makes it more likely another person will also comment. So what do you say? Want to make a writer happy today?


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24 comments:

  1. Good article - I'll try to remember this in the future! Thanks

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  2. Good advice!

    I only wish more authors would cultivate enhanced dialogue of diverse opinion rather than echo chambers of homogeneous opinion.

    BTW--Great article!

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  3. I always try to leave a comment, if I have anything at all to say. I do a lot of blogging myself, and I know how much of a validation it is to have someone take the time to add even a line or two.

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  4. Hi Donna, I'm currently writing a blog article on this very subject! I totally agree with you.

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  5. Thanks everyone for your comments. I'm glad you all liked my article.

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  6. Very nice article, I always try to leave comment when I read any article.

    Regards,
    Pawan Bahuguna

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  7. The only reason I don't leave comments is because ninety percent of the time bloggers make their websites comment unfriendly. I usually read on my phone, and it's a tremendous pain in the behind to fill in all their forms and jump through the hoops. Yours is EASY! Well done and nice article :) xoxo

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    1. wonderful points altogether, you simply won a new reader.
      What could you recommend about your publish that you juust made some days ago?
      Any positive? hygetropin

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  8. Leaving a comment is like a little hug to show you care! You've been hugged. Hope you have a wonderful reading week!
    E

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    1. Thanks for the hug! I always hate writing post like this because I don't want people to think I'm looking for attention, but at the same time I think people don't know how important comments can be.

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  9. "Your comment doesn't have to 'add' to the conversation or be some profound statement to be appreciated by the writer" - so very true, but not something I'd articulated to myself this clearly - thank you :)

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  10. I figure if the article engaged me enough that I read the whole thing start to finish, it merits a comment. Thanks.

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  11. I love reading comments too. It somehow makes all the work feel worthwhile.

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  12. I totally agree... sometimes, I wonder if anyone actually reads anything I write or not! Especially with books sales. When I actually got sales on a regular basis I got no reviews to show for it! :)

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  13. Comments and reviews are food for authors. We need them and strive for them. I hope you get many more good reviews and comments.

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  14. This is great advice I plan to use. Thanks!

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  15. Sometimes I find advice in the comments that helps as much as the article itself.

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  16. Sometimes I find advice in the comments that helps as much as the article itself.

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  17. I try and leave a comment when I have something to say. I certainly share it too.

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  18. Very informative blog post. Thank you, Donna

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  19. I agree. I enjoy getting feedback from my readers.

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  20. Here I am commenting on why you should leave a comment. LOL.

    Just do it.

    :)

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  21. It's true. Yet at the same time... I don't know if it's the editor in me, or the introvert, or the high school teacher, but while a comment doesn't HAVE to add to a conversation, simply saying "I agree" or "me too" feels insufficient. It speaks to the current effort being worthwhile, yes, but not to where to take the next effort. And if I'm going to actually expend the energy to say something, I need a better reason than simple acknowledgment.

    The paradox, of course, is that this "reader" hat is different from my "writer" hat. I write serials, and average a lone comment per month. Sometimes, I hope for at least an "encouragement" remark. Other times, I sigh and whatever. I also wonder, if I did receive more "encouragement", would it become insufficient, would I want "feedback"?

    No answers here, just more questions! But your post did make me think. Thanks for that.

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